January 23, 2022, 17:28

Novak Djokovic denied entry to Australia, seeking injunction to stop deportation

Novak Djokovic denied entry to Australia, seeking injunction to stop deportation

Novak Djokovic, the number one tennis star in the world, was denied entry into Australia on Thursday after initially being granted a medical exemption for the country’s Covid-19 vaccination requirements so that he could play in the Australian Open.

The tennis star, left stranded at Melbourne’s Tullamanrien airport overnight, was issued a letter by the Australian government saying his visa had been denied and he would be deported, a source close to the tournament told Reuters.

The tennis star was filing an injunction to prevent his deportation, the source said.

Djokovic was left stranded at a Melbourne airport overnight, having touched down Wednesday about 11:30 p.m. local time after a 14-hour flight from Dubai.

It emerged that his team had applied for a visa that does not allow for medical exemptions.

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That prompted the local government of Victoria, the state where the Open is played, to say it would not support Djokovic’s application.

The extraordinary move by the Australian government to block Djokovic from entering the country because of a mistake on his visa form threatened to cause a diplomatic incident between Canberra and Belgrade.

“I’ve just finished my telephone conversation with Novak Djokovic,” Serbian president Aleksandar Vucic posted on Instagram. “I told our Novak that the whole of Serbia is with him and that our bodies are doing everything to see that the harassment of the world’s best tennis player is brought to an end immediately.

“In line with all norms of international law, Serbia will fight for Novak, truth and justice. Novak is strong, as we all know.”

Vucic had summoned the Australian ambassador in Belgrade and demanded that they immediately release Djokovic to play, Serbian media reported.

Djokovic’s father Srdjan said that his son was waiting alone in a room at the airport under armed guard for a final decision on whether he could enter the country.

“I have no clue what’s going on, they’ve kept my son in captivity for five hours now,” Srdjan told the Serbian online version of Sputnik. “If they don’t let him go in half a hour, we’ll gather in the streets, this is a battle for everyone.”

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“Not the most usual trip from Down Under,” coach Goran Ivanisevic commented beside an Instagram selfie from the airport lounge, accompanied by face-palm and mind-blown emojis.

Morrison has faced an enormous backlash over his government’s decision to grant Djokovic a medical exemption from vaccination to play at the Open, leading to fingerpointing between the Prime Minister’s conservative administration and the left-leaning Victorian government led by premier Dan Andrews.

Australia, especially the state of Victoria, has endured the world’s longest cumulative lockdown and an outbreak of the Omicron variant has sent case numbers to record levels.

Following the backlash, Morrison suggested Djokovic’s participation was not a done deal and he would have to satisfy the federal government, which has responsibility for international borders and visas and was not part of the exemption process.

Morrison said shortly before Djokovic’s arrival that there would be “no special rules” for him on his exemption.

“If that evidence is insufficient, then he won’t be treated any different to anyone else and he’ll be on the next plane home,” Morrison told a media conference earlier.

Visa bungle

Djokovic came in on an Emirates flight but when border officials contacted the Victorian government to ask if the state would formally support the world number one’s visa, it said it would not.

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“The Federal Government has asked if we will support Novak Djokovic’s visa application to enter Australia,” Victoria’s acting Sports Minister Jaala Pulford said.

“We will not be providing Novak Djokovic with individual visa application support to participate in the 2022 Australian Open Grand Slam.

“We’ve always been clear on two points: visa approvals are a matter for the Federal Government, and medical exemptions are a matter for doctors.”

It was not clear whether the federal government would allow his entry. The Border Force did not respond to a request for comment.

Tennis Australia and government officials moved quickly to stress that Djokovic had received no preferential treatment.

Angry Aussies

The Serbian, who has previously declined to reveal his vaccination status, has won nine titles at Melbourne Park including the last three. He confirmed on Tuesday that had received a vaccination exemption to allow him to play at the Australian Open, which starts on January 17th.

Australian tennis great Rod Laver, after whom the main showcourt at Melbourne Park in the state of Victoria is named, warned that Djokovic might face hostility from the local crowd.

“I think it might get ugly,” Laver told News Corp. “I’d think the Victorian people would be thinking ‘Yes I’d love to see him play and compete, but at the same time there’s a right way and a wrong way.’

“Yes, you’re a great player and you’ve performed and won so many tournaments, so it can’t be physical. So what is the problem?”

Melbourne local Christine Wharton said it was a “disgrace”.

“We’ve all done the right thing, we’ve all gone out and got our jabs and our boosters, and we have someone that’s come from overseas and all of a sudden he’s been exempt and can play, and I think it’s an absolute disgrace and I won’t be watching it.” – Reuters

Sourse: breakingnews.ie

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